Are you rebuilding old beers from your area?

Discussion in 'Brewing Photos & Videos' started by Head First, Jun 17, 2016.

  1. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    The history of beer in the USA is a much shorter span of time than the European beer history. With that said how many people are trying to brew old beers that come from where they live worldwide? Nosy is obviously onto his Kentucky Common. In Montana a couple of Brewery's have resurrected turn of the century beers. Highlander of what is now Missoula brewing company has brought back an old lager which is quite tasty for what was at the time a commercial lager. Harvest Moon in Belt Montana built an ale with the same flavor of a beer my dad used to drink Great Falls Select which in my opinion tastes as bad as the beer I snuck out of the frig when I was a kid. Obviously brewed with German Select hops which were grown I think in B.C. Canada. The entire northwest was pretty much all lager beers as far as I know.
     
  2. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    Interesting thread. Dayton, OH isn't particularly known for a brewing history. But nearby Cincinnati is. I do know of some swill aka college student beer they've long produced. They make good stuff, too. Some of it has come and gone. Some of it is still being brewed. Dayton does have an 1800s style brewery in a historical park. They make beer of the time. It's German oriented, from immigrants of the day. Most of the beer they make is sour. I don't care for that. But their nut brown inspired my nut brown.
     
  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Not just Ky Common! I love brewing the historical styles and have done a pre-Prohibition style pale ale, lager, I've done Grodziskie and Kottbusser. Granted we're reproducing those styles with modern ingredients - no one knows what they would really taste like today. But I'm also old enough to remember differences in American Pilsners from back when breweries were regional, Cream Ales from the Ohio Valley, any number of styles that are becoming obsolete. Unfortunately, I'm also old enough to remember regional differences in Pilsners in Germany, a country also going through the consolidation we've experienced (and fighting back the same way, with smaller, local breweries). Here in Denver, there's the Tivoli Brewery and its wonderful Helles, also extincted until it was brought back by a local brewery.
     

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