Add option for Anhydrous Calcium Chloride in the water calculator

Discussion in 'Feature Requests' started by ChicoBrewer, Jun 30, 2019.

  1. ChicoBrewer

    ChicoBrewer Well-Known Member

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    #1 ChicoBrewer, Jun 30, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2019
    I entered the same batch info in both Bru'n water (paid version 5.5) and the BF Advanced calculator. I noticed a wide variance in the Calcium and Chloride. After fiddling with it I noticed that the BF calculator uses CaCl2 Dihydrate while the Bru'n water gives the option to use either Dihydrate or Anhydrous. Since the LD Carlson CaCl2 I use is anhydrous there is no way for me to be accurate using the BF Calculator. Can you add the option for Anhydrous CaCl2?

    Edit - my research tells me that Ball Pickle crisp is also anhydrous and I believe a lot of people use it as a salt to add both Calcium and Chloride.
     
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  2. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    I don’t have brun’water on my iPad, and I won’t see Martin today to ask him about the formula he uses (saw him all weekend and that never came up!). Do you have the info on the anhydrous to add that to the calculator? Otherwise, I’ll be home from HomebrewCon tomorrow and can try to find it later tomorrow so no worries if you can’t!
     
  3. ChicoBrewer

    ChicoBrewer Well-Known Member

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    Well I dusted my high school inorganic chemistry knowledge ;)

    It's pretty straightforward but I can't download the excel file I used so here is a screen shot of the output.

    P.S. this is not copyrighted material. I learned it in high school chemistry in 1975 LOL but I did have some fun pulling it out of my head after all these years and it still makes perfect sense.

    variance.jpg
     

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