50 / 50 Wheat Beer

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Tar and Feather'em, Mar 11, 2016.

  1. Tar and Feather'em

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    So I see lots of 50% Wheat 50% some other malt as a basic recipe. I have always tried 2-Row for the other but I can't say I like it? Something is not quite right for the taste I am going for or expectig. I was thinking of trying 50% Munich next time but thought to ask around for others favorite combinations for wheats.
     
  2. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Have you thought about Vienna or Maris Otter? Not sure what kind of taste you've got in mind, but I think those would complement the wheat fairly well.
    Other than a test batch to see what 100% Munich would taste like, I havent ever used it. To me, seems like it's not really suited for a hoppier beer.

    Can you describe what you thought was missing from the 2row?

    Fwiw, I'd say do a few small batches to test out different malts and do a side by side taste test. Really helped me to be able to put words to tastes and smells.
     
  3. Tar and Feather'em

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    What I think it is missing is it is very thin, no flavor balance. Like a contrast between the wheat vs 2 Row? Where I am expecting a better blend. If that makes sense?

    You hit on a good point with the Vienna though, I like that idea a lot. Munich might be a bit much but it will have a better mouthfeel and a little malt that the 2 Row lacks.

    Hmmm Vienna....
     
  4. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    I think I get ya.
    I haven't done 2 and 6 row side by side to compare, but they're like the white rice of malt to me. Nothing wrong with them, but kind of boring by themselves.
    Based on what you're looking for, I still think just Munich might not be quite right for you.
    With vienna, you're going for a dry wheat toast vibe. With munich, its more of a doughy wheat bread (chewy even if that makes sense)
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Actually it's a great chance to experiment. I happen to like 50/50 American wheats done with pale ale malt. I use the malt from Colorado Malting Company, perhaps not available everywhere. Maris Otter or Golden Promise should make a nice 50/50 beer but the thought of using Vienna or Munich is intriguing, maybe even the breadier Pilsners. Hmmm (strokes beard evilly).
     
  6. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    slight hijack, i recently did a wheat / 2row base beer to try out some different hops. i snuck a few early bottles, and they were all pretty darn good. im hoping to take some notes this weekend and post here (in another topic of course)

    anyway, i guess my rambling point is, depending on what you're going for, you might want a "bland" base malt so that other stuff can shine
     
  7. wolfie7873

    wolfie7873 Member

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    Only beer competition I've ever won anything was third place last year with a 50/50 Wheat/Munich beer.
     
  8. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    and wolfie proves another good point, don't always trust one source. ask around :D
     
  9. Tar and Feather'em

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    Well we have a Wheat / Munich winner posting here haha. All the feedback is great thank you. It could be I am over hopping so any trace of malt flavor is gone I have thought of that too but the white rice comparison is kind of what I was feeling.
     
  10. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    One thing not discussed is the yeast choice. Another is mash temperature.
    Both can make a huge difference in taste and mouthfeel. I'd suggest experimenting with those 2 before I'd abandon pale malt.
    I currently have a Hefeweizen on with nothing other than pils and wheat that has incredible body, mouthfeel and flavor.
    Good Luck,
    Brian
     
  11. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    that's a good point.

    some dextrine malt might also be a good interim fix
     
  12. Tar and Feather'em

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    Well I hear ya but the point is 50/50 so adding anything else is a moot point.

    I would like to know more about yeast. I have done only dry Salfale 05 and the Safale Wheat one in the purple packet.
     
  13. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    For a Hefe, wlp380 is great
    For a Wit, wlp400 or 410 is good
    for an America wheat, Safale 05, wlp001 or 1056 are good choices. I also like wlp051 for this style.
    Good Luck
    Brian
     
  14. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Doh, totally forgot the point of the thread

    i haven't used it in a wheat based beer, but i immediately thought of an English yeast to bring out the malt side of things. I've only used wlp002, but i liked it enough. I don't recall any mention of hop choice, so this may be a bad yeast from that angle.
     
  15. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    If you're doing a 50/50 wheat beer and are having problems with mouthfeel, it isn't in the grains. That ratio of wheat in the mix with its higher protein level should produce a fairly viscous, rather silky mouthfeel. Check mash temps if your mouthfeel's too thin - the mash temps are likely too low (a problem I'm mulling over with my converted 10-gallon cooler mash tun) or you're doing too long of a protein rest.
     
  16. Tar and Feather'em

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    Ya know maybe you are on to something with the mash temps, great point thank you. I am usually mashing BIAB between 150 to 154 at the widest, maybe bring it up to 157/8? And the idea of an English ale yeast is interesting as well. For the record I am not going for a hefe I am keeping the idea american light and easy drinking. Lots of great points here thanks everyone.
     
  17. wolfie7873

    wolfie7873 Member

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    FWIW, in my 50/50 Wheat/Munich, I did a multiple-infusion stepped mash. Used fairly mild hops and Danstar Munich dry yeast.
     

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