3 noob question from a 1st time home brewer

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by ArEiAs82, Jul 20, 2016.

  1. ArEiAs82

    ArEiAs82 New Member

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    Hi there Homebrewers!

    So, i started my first brewing adventure with a kit of american pilsner.

    Did the 1st fermentation during 1 week (there was only airlock activity from day 2 to day 3)and then i syphon it to another fermentation keg

    Used normal household white sugar (I know... Next one you'll use spraymalt...)
    The hydrometer measured: OG:1039º (Before yeast) and FG:1008º (when i syphoned it to 2nd fermentation keg) = 4,0% of alcool

    - Question nº1: How much quantity of priming sugar (Dextrose) should i use to prime now?
    In the instruccions of the kit (2 photos) i suposed to add 85gms per 23 liters but after searching the internet and using some online calculators it says to use about 173 gms of dextrose per 23 liters.
    Now im confused... I like my beer very fizzy but i dont want bottle bombs on my fridge:) What's the correct grams of dextrose to add on 23 liters of american pilsner on 21cº to archieve something like 2,7 volume of CO2?

    - Question nº2: I don't know if it's enough another week on the 2nd fermentation keg (2 weeks total) before bottling, is it?

    - Question nº3: After bottling, how many days should i let them on the bottle before opening? How many days on warm? And how many days in the fridge?

    Thank you in advance!
    Sorry for my english (It's not my native language)
     

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  2. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    First of all, welcome!

    I can't speak to the lagering question, but there's a priming calculator here that works quite well. Just put in your numbers and it will tell you the amount of sugar to use. It lists a few different types of sugars too in case you have others.

    After bottling, it takes me about 2 weeks or so to have them carbonated. I just put the bottles in the pantry or a spare bedroom. As long as they are out of the light, they'll be fine.

    But, carbonated and ready to drink are not the same thing. I'd say 1-2 months is a good rule of thumb for when they are ready.

    And my friend, the fridge is only to get them cold. Put some in the fridge before work and they will be ready to pop open when you get home
     
  3. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Btw, way to jump right into it with a pilsner. I still haven't attempted a lager yet.

    Also, your secondary English is better than some people's primary English I've seen. ;)
     
  4. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    It's not very likely that the kit included a lager yeast. Most canned kits include ale yeasts and the temperatures listed in the instructions bear that out. At best it would be a "steam lager" at those temperatures, even if it had a lager yeast strain. That doesn't mean it won't be a good beer, but not likely to be a very sophisticated version of a Pilsner style.

    You'll find that 3 weeks should ensure good, even carbonation and a few more weeks of bottle conditioning at 21C will probably be sufficient to have a drinkable beer. More time in warm conditioning and more time in cold conditioning nearly always helps to improve the flavor and it really depends on how well the fermentation process went. Some beers, even ones made with true lager yeasts can be quite good with just a couple of weeks in warm temperature and a week in the fridge. Some simple ales can be very enjoyable in even less time.

    I agree that your communication in English is very good, indeed. No need to apologize. ;)
     
  5. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    Brewers Best lager kits contain either S-23 or W-34/70 lager yeasts. The directions state cooler temperatures are best, but they will perform well at ale fermenting temperatures. By the time I bought my first lager kit, I had my fermentation chamber. Never tried it warm.
     
  6. ArEiAs82

    ArEiAs82 New Member

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    I actually live in Portugal. We drink way more Lagers than Ales here. That's why :)
    Too much films ans series alows me to practice my english :)
     
  7. ArEiAs82

    ArEiAs82 New Member

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    I really don't know what was the yeast. Always thought that it cames with the most correct for the beer of the specific kit, but as i can see by the instrucions, that's pretty widespread...
    Thank you for your help!
     
  8. ArEiAs82

    ArEiAs82 New Member

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    Thank you. From now on i'll always check on the yeast...
     
  9. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    well, this just means you have to start creating your own recipes to get all the ingredients you want/need into the beer :D
     
  10. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    plus, it's always a learning experience.

    my first beer (an irish stout) came out a bit vinegar like and flat tasting (not flat as in carbonation, but no real pop! to the taste). i remember sanitizing everything that first time, and stirring the crap out of the wort to get it to cool down
     
  11. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    The S-23 makes sense. A "steam" lager style American Pilsner with that yeast should be a pretty good beer. I've got some I want to try in a water bath/swamp cooler at 67-68 degrees on a Cream Ale or Boston Lager-style steam lager.
     
  12. ArEiAs82

    ArEiAs82 New Member

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    LOL
    - "What kind of beer did ou make? What's the recipe?"
    - "That's not beer. That's my vinager for seasoning salad recipe"
     
  13. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Haha, it's gotten better since then I swear
     
  14. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    A lager the first time out? Pretty ambitious! But the bottom line is a lager isn't harder than ale as long as you have the necessary equipment to keep the beer cool. Generally for an American Pils, I'd allow two weeks for primary fermentation at 10°C to 12.5°C, then four weeks lagering as close to 0°C as possible. The recommendation to do a steam-style "lager" is a good one but you'd still need to cool it to the 15° range for the entire fermentation. And I'm sure it's pretty warm in Portugal this time of year so plan accordingly.

    The calculator on this page will tell you how much priming sugar is required to get 2.7 vols of CO2. Since I don't know how warm your beer has gotten during and after fermentation, I can't tell you how much sugar to use.

    And generally bottles carb and are ready to drink two weeks after bottling if held at room temperature.

    Good luck with it!
     
  15. ArEiAs82

    ArEiAs82 New Member

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    First of all, thank you!

    It wasn't me who choose the extract. I was on a worshop of beer brewing and the "teacher" was the one who choose the American Pilsner...

    What you mean with: "four weeks lagering"? Is it the 2nd fermentation?

    Unfortunaly the lowest temperature that i have is in the basement with 20°/21°C (Always pretty stable at that temperature - Only stay for 24°/25° While the fermentation was very active)... What do you think that will happen to the beer? Is it ruined?

    Another noob question is: "What is a "steam-style "lager""?
     
  16. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    Lagering would occur during your secondary fermentation. I rack (transfer) my lager when fermentation is complete into a 5 gallon carboy. Then I slowly lower my temperature to near 32°F, and it lagers (sits) for 4 weeks. That's my general method.

    I'll defer the steam style lager question to someone who has access to Google ;)
     
  17. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Assuming it was an ale yeast, then it won't be too bad at that temp. Not ideal, but I've done it before and the beer was fine. A bit more fruity / ester-y than intended, but it was still drinkable.

    I'll try for the steam lager. In California back in the 1800s or so, they fermented in these long cool ships (trays). The vapors coming off it (forget if it's steam from cooling wort or a little water vapor from the fermentation), would look like steam.

    Anchor Steam is a good example here in the US
     
  18. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    And to actually answer your question, steam style is just a lager fermented closer to ale temperatures
     
  19. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    If 20°C is the coolest your basement can get, don't try to do an American Pils. You can still use the extract but try for a blonde ale instead. At those temperatures, the Pilsner Yeast will make you a very fruity beer with potential for lots of off flavors. Get your hands on some American Ale yeast, say Safale US-05, and a tub big enough to hold your fermentor. After chilling and pitching the yeast, put the fermentor in the tub and fill the tub with water until the fermentor is just barely not floating. That will stabilize your temperature. Since you've already made the beer, next time, take the same extract and pitch Belle Saison yeast. It will thrive in the temperatures you mentioned and will make you a very nice Saison.
     
  20. ArEiAs82

    ArEiAs82 New Member

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    Next i'll make an irish dry stout. I think it will be better at this temperatures...
    Is there anything that i can do to "save" this beer?
     

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